Three Black women of different skin shades resting their heads together.

21 Self-Care Rituals for Black Women

Valentine’s Day welcomes an opportunity to reflect on what love really entails and receive the love we deserve for one unique day. 

In today’s consumer age of self-care obsession, single women are a new target of Valentine’s Day marketing strategies, as we’re encouraged to spend money on pricey skin care products and other stuff that offers surface level healing. 

However, as Black women, we don’t receive nearly the amount of love or encouragement to #SelfCare the way other women do. Fortunately, other Black women in wellness are recognizing this gap in the market and advocating for a personalized approach to caring for ourselves.  

It’s necessary for our sanity to create self-care rituals that heal our unique wounds, not just on Valentine’s Day, but every day. So for my highly melanated sisters, here’s my gift to you: 21 Self-Care Rituals for Black Women to practice regularly!

1. Take a hot bath or shower and slowly massage your skin from toe to head with specific oils for African American skin, acknowledging and appreciating every divine inch of your body as you go.

2. Make your own DIY deep conditioner out of natural plant ingredients. Cover your crown with that bonnet and let your roots lie in luxury. 

3. Exfoliate your brown skin with a DIY body scrub made from coffee grinds, sugar, and natural oils. 

4. Set up a DIY home steaming station and give your yoni the warm embrace she deserves. 

Black woman smiling and embracing herself in a hug.

5. Treat yourself to a gourmet vegan meal. Let it be as nutritious as one of Chef Babette’s creations from Stuff I Eat in Inglewood or as indulgent as the vegetarian platter from literally anywhere in Little Ethiopia, Los Angeles. 

6. Transform your home into a solo AfroNation festival. Light some incense, let your fro loose, and turn up the bass on your favorite afrobeats playlist as you twerk your soul free. 

Black woman posing in sunglasses

7. Create a Black Girl Magic #inspo board on Pinterest featuring your favorite makeup, beauty, hair, and fashion looks modeled by Black women. 

8. Listen to your favorite gospel music from your childhood and shout the lyrics from your personal mountaintop into the heavens. 

9. Create a YASS QUEEN music playlist featuring all the songs that inspire you to lift your crown, ranging from Diana Ross to Destiny’s Child to Doja Cat. Might as well throw some Lizzo in there too and embrace her self-love spirit

10. Write a letter to your teenage self, detailing everything she should love about herself despite what the world says she should change. 

11. Make a list of all the generational curses that you have broken or plan to break during your lifetime.

Three Black women of different skin shades resting their heads together.

12. Text your Black female friends and tell them each one unique thing you love and respect about them. 

13. Treat yourself to a gift from a Black, female owned business. When you receive the item send her an encouraging message of gratitude via email or social media. 

14. Make a list of your personal Black, female role models, being sure to include women you personally know. 

15. Call your mom or another motherly figure in your life and ask her to share a crucial life lesson she learned as a Black woman. 

 

16. Find a quiet space and follow a guided meditation specifically created for Black women’s healing.

17. Watch a film featuring a badass Black, female character that doesn’t perpetuate tired and tried stereotypes such as struggling single mothers, domestic violence victims, or angry man-repellers.

18. Donate money to or schedule a time to volunteer with an organization that advances Black girls, such as Black Girls Code.

Black woman standing in front of a bookcase full of books by Black authors.

19. Visit your local library and check out a book written by a Black female literary hero

20. Make an Amazon wishlist of books written by Black, female authors or other titles that portray Black women in a positive light. 

21. Cry when you need to. The world expects us to be strong and stoic and sometimes we unintentionally hold in emotions that need natural release, leading to a personal mental health crisis triggered by stong Black woman stereotype. Cry when you’re feeling unbelievably blessed, when you’re angry, when you’re wounded from racial and gender-based discrimination, when you’re frustrated, and when you feel the weight of the world and just need to shake it loose for a bit. 

Whenever I think of black women there’s one word that comes to mind: strength. However, as I grew older and strived to persevere like my ancestors and role models, I realized how much pressure it was to live in a constant state of survival mode. It was important to pause and reflect on the historical trauma in my community and heal instead of striving to be a superwoman. Although this strength is almost magical, black women are human and deserve time to process the trauma and complexities in our communities and daily lives." - Leah Thomas via The Good Trade

Black Woman: In case no one has told you lately, you are beautiful, you are divine, and you are worthy of love including that which comes from deep within you. 

I hope this article finds you and inspires you to take some time to practice self-care and develop wellness practices that heal you and help you walk in your abundance.

Be sure to share this post with your sisters who will also benefit from any of these wellness practices!

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